What Gen Hemi Do I Have?

What Gen Hemi Do I Have?

The Hemi engine is a legendary engine that has powered some of the most iconic muscle cars in history. But with so many different Hemi engines over the years, it can be difficult to know which one you have.

In this article, we’ll take a look at the different generations of Hemi engines and how to identify which one you have. We’ll also discuss the performance differences between the different generations, so you can make an informed decision about which Hemi engine is right for you.

So whether you’re a Mopar enthusiast or you’re just curious about Hemi engines, read on to learn more!

“`html

Gen Hemi Years Engine Code
1st Gen 1951-1958 241, 261, 283
2nd Gen 1959-1964 318, 340, 350
3rd Gen 1965-1971 318, 340, 360
4th Gen 1972-1978 318, 340, 360, 400
5th Gen 1979-1986 5.2L
6th Gen 1987-1992 5.9L
7th Gen 1993-2003 5.7L
8th Gen 2004-2009 5.7L
9th Gen 2010-Present 5.7L, 6.1L, 6.4L

“`

The Hemi engine is a type of V8 engine that was first introduced by Chrysler in 1951. Hemi engines are known for their high power output and distinctive hemispherical combustion chambers. Over the years, Chrysler has produced a number of different Hemi engines, each with its own unique features.

If you’re wondering what generation Hemi engine you have, there are a few different ways to find out. In this article, we’ll take a look at the different ways to identify your Hemi engine, as well as the different generations of Hemi engines that have been produced.

How to Identify Your Hemi Engine

There are a few different ways to identify your Hemi engine. The most common way is to look at the VIN number. The VIN number is a unique identifier that is assigned to each vehicle. The VIN number can be found on a sticker on the driver’s side doorjamb.

The VIN number can also be used to identify the engine. The 8th digit of the VIN number will tell you the engine code. The following table shows the engine codes for the different generations of Hemi engines:

| Generation | Engine Code |
|—|—|
| Gen I | 273 |
| Gen II | 340 |
| Gen III | 5.7L |
| Gen IV | 6.1L |

Another way to identify your Hemi engine is to look at the engine block casting number. The engine block casting number is a unique identifier that is stamped on the engine block. The engine block casting number can be found on the back of the engine block, near the oil pan.

The engine block casting number can also be used to identify the engine. The following table shows the engine block casting numbers for the different generations of Hemi engines:

| Generation | Engine Block Casting Number |
|—|—|
| Gen I | 273 |
| Gen II | 340 |
| Gen III | 5.7L |
| Gen IV | 6.1L |

Finally, you can also identify your Hemi engine by looking at the engine identification tag. The engine identification tag is a small metal tag that is attached to the engine. The engine identification tag will list the engine code, as well as other information about the engine.

The engine identification tag can be found on the front of the engine, near the valve cover.

Different Generations of Hemi Engines

The Hemi engine has been produced in a number of different generations over the years. Each generation of Hemi engine has its own unique features.

Gen I (1951-1958)

The Gen I Hemi engine was the first Hemi engine to be produced. It was introduced by Chrysler in 1951 and was used in a variety of vehicles, including the Chrysler 300B and the Dodge D-500. The Gen I Hemi engine was a 273 cubic inch V8 engine that produced 240 horsepower.

Gen II (1964-1971)

The Gen II Hemi engine was introduced by Chrysler in 1964. It was used in a variety of vehicles, including the Dodge Charger and the Plymouth Road Runner. The Gen II Hemi engine was a 426 cubic inch V8 engine that produced 425 horsepower.

Gen III (1992-2003)

The Gen III Hemi engine was introduced by Chrysler in 1992. It was used in a variety of vehicles, including the Dodge Ram and the Jeep Grand Cherokee. The Gen III Hemi engine was a 5.7 liter V8 engine that produced 250 horsepower.

Gen IV (2005-present)

The Gen IV Hemi engine was introduced by Chrysler in 2005. It is the most recent generation of Hemi engine and is used in a variety of vehicles, including the Dodge Challenger and the Jeep Wrangler. The Gen IV Hemi engine is a 6.1 liter V8 engine that produces 425 horsepower.

The Hemi engine is a powerful and iconic engine that has been used in a variety of vehicles over the years. There are a number of different ways to identify your Hemi engine, including the VIN number, the engine block casting number, and the engine identification tag. The different generations of Hemi engines have their own unique features, and each generation has been used in a variety of vehicles.

3. Differences Between Hemi Engines

The Hemi engine is a type of V8 engine that was first introduced by Chrysler in 1951. Hemi engines are known for their high power output and smooth performance. There have been four generations of Hemi engines produced over the years, each with its own unique features.

  • Chrysler Hemi (1951-1958)

The original Hemi engine was introduced in 1951 and was used in a variety of Chrysler vehicles, including the Chrysler 300, Dodge Coronet, and DeSoto Firedome. The original Hemi engine had a displacement of 331 cubic inches and produced 240 horsepower.

  • Second-generation Hemi (1964-1971)

The second-generation Hemi engine was introduced in 1964 and was used in a variety of high-performance Chrysler vehicles, including the Dodge Charger, Plymouth Road Runner, and Dodge Challenger. The second-generation Hemi engine had a displacement of 426 cubic inches and produced up to 425 horsepower.

  • Third-generation Hemi (1972-1978)

The third-generation Hemi engine was introduced in 1972 and was used in a variety of Chrysler vehicles, including the Chrysler New Yorker, Dodge Monaco, and Plymouth Fury. The third-generation Hemi engine had a displacement of 400 cubic inches and produced up to 250 horsepower.

  • Fourth-generation Hemi (2003-present)

The fourth-generation Hemi engine was introduced in 2003 and is still in production today. The fourth-generation Hemi engine has a displacement of 5.7, 6.1, 6.4, or 6.2 liters and produces up to 707 horsepower.

Cylinder head design

The most distinctive feature of the Hemi engine is its hemispherical combustion chambers. Hemispherical combustion chambers are more efficient than traditional combustion chambers, which helps to improve fuel economy and power output.

  • First-generation Hemi

The first-generation Hemi engine had a single overhead camshaft (SOHC) and hemispherical combustion chambers. The SOHC design allowed for a more compact engine, which helped to improve performance.

  • Second-generation Hemi

The second-generation Hemi engine had a dual overhead camshaft (DOHC) and hemispherical combustion chambers. The DOHC design provided more power and improved fuel economy than the SOHC design.

  • Third-generation Hemi

The third-generation Hemi engine had a single overhead camshaft (SOHC) and hemispherical combustion chambers. The SOHC design was used to reduce emissions and improve fuel economy.

  • Fourth-generation Hemi

The fourth-generation Hemi engine has a dual overhead camshaft (DOHC) and hemispherical combustion chambers. The DOHC design provides more power and improved fuel economy than the SOHC design.

Valvetrain design

The valvetrain design of the Hemi engine has also evolved over the years. The first-generation Hemi engine had a pushrod valvetrain, while the second-generation Hemi engine had a hydraulic roller valvetrain. The third-generation Hemi engine had a hydraulic flat-tappet valvetrain, while the fourth-generation Hemi engine has a hydraulic roller valvetrain.

  • Pushrod valvetrain

A pushrod valvetrain uses pushrods to operate the valves. Pushrod valvetrains are simple and inexpensive to manufacture, but they are not as efficient as other valvetrain designs.

  • Hydraulic roller valvetrain

A hydraulic roller valvetrain uses hydraulic lifters to operate the valves. Hydraulic roller valvetrains are more efficient than pushrod valvetrains, but they are more expensive to manufacture.

  • Hydraulic flat-tappet valvetrain

A hydraulic flat-tappet valvetrain uses hydraulic lifters to operate the valves. Hydraulic flat-tappet valvetrains are a compromise between pushrod valvetrains and hydraulic roller valvetrains. They are more efficient than pushrod valvetrains, but they are less expensive to manufacture than hydraulic roller valvetrains.

Engine displacement

The displacement of the Hemi engine has also increased over the years. The first-generation Hemi engine had a displacement of 331 cubic inches, while the second-generation Hemi engine had a displacement of 426 cubic inches. The third-generation Hemi engine had a displacement of 400 cubic inches, while the fourth-generation Hemi engine has a displacement of 5.7, 6.1, 6.4, or 6.2 liters.

Power output

The power output of the

What Gen Hemi Do I Have?

The Hemi engine is a family of V8 engines produced by Chrysler. The first Hemi engine was introduced in 1951, and the latest generation was introduced in 2015. To determine which generation of Hemi engine you have, you can look at the following:

  • Engine code: The engine code is a four-digit number that is stamped on the engine block. The first digit of the engine code indicates the generation of the Hemi engine.
  • Engine displacement: The engine displacement is the total volume of the cylinders in the engine. The engine displacement is measured in cubic inches (ci).
  • Engine year: The engine year is the year in which the engine was produced.

Here is a table that shows the engine code, engine displacement, and engine year for each generation of Hemi engine:

| Generation | Engine Code | Engine Displacement | Engine Year |
|—|—|—|—|
| 1st Gen | 270 | 270 ci | 1951-1958 |
| 2nd Gen | 318 | 318 ci | 1959-1971 |
| 3rd Gen | 340 | 340 ci | 1972-1978 |
| 4th Gen | 426 | 426 ci | 1964-1971 |
| 5th Gen | 5.7L | 5.7 L | 2003-2009 |
| 6th Gen | 6.1L | 6.1 L | 2010-2014 |
| 7th Gen | 6.4L | 6.4 L | 2015-Present |

If you are unable to find the engine code or engine displacement on your engine, you can also try to identify the generation of your Hemi engine by its appearance. The following table shows the different generations of Hemi engines and their distinctive features:

| Generation | Distinctive Features |
|—|—|
| 1st Gen | Flat-top pistons, hemispherical combustion chambers |
| 2nd Gen | Round-top pistons, wedge-shaped combustion chambers |
| 3rd Gen | Round-top pistons, hemispherical combustion chambers |
| 4th Gen | Hemispherical combustion chambers, rectangular intake ports |
| 5th Gen | Hemispherical combustion chambers, oval intake ports |
| 6th Gen | Hemispherical combustion chambers, rectangular intake ports |
| 7th Gen | Hemispherical combustion chambers, oval intake ports |

By following these steps, you can easily determine which generation of Hemi engine you have.

In this blog post, we have discussed the different generations of Hemi engines and how to identify which generation you have. We hope this information has been helpful and that you are now able to identify your Hemi engine.

Here are some key takeaways from this blog post:

  • The Hemi engine is a type of V8 engine that was first introduced by Chrysler in 1951.
  • There are five generations of Hemi engines, each with its own unique features.
  • The easiest way to identify which generation of Hemi engine you have is by looking at the VIN number.
  • The Hemi engine is a powerful and reliable engine that has been used in a variety of vehicles, from muscle cars to trucks.

We hope you enjoyed this blog post and that you found it informative. If you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment below.

Author Profile

PST Converter Team
PST Converter Team
With a small office in 18 Ely Place, 2nd Floor, New York, NY – 10006, our journey began with a simple yet powerful vision: to make technology work for people, not the other way around.

From 2019 to 2022, we specialized in providing a seamless ‘PST to Mbox’ Converter service, a niche but crucial tool for countless professionals and individuals. Our dedicated team worked tirelessly to ensure that your data migration needs were met with efficiency and ease. It was a journey filled with learning, growth, and an unwavering commitment to our clients.

In 2023, we embraced a pivotal shift. While our roots in data conversion are strong, we realized our potential to impact a broader audience. We expanded our horizons to address a more diverse array of tech challenges. Today, we are more than just a service provider; we are a hub of knowledge and solutions.

Our focus now is on delivering in-depth articles, insightful content, and answers to queries that are hard to find or often misunderstood. We understand the frustration of searching for reliable information in the vast ocean of the internet. That’s why we’re here to be your compass, guiding you to accurate, trustworthy, and valuable insights.

Similar Posts